With an unexpected opportunity to teach SFU CMPT 363 User Interface Design this summer, I’ve been feverishly working in the open on the accompanying Canvas LMS site (leveraging my Grav Open Course Hub project) so that potential students can better self-assess course fit before our first class meets in-person on May 9th. It’s also already proven to be a great way to start conversations with those students already registered.

The summer offering brings some changes, with the addition of a journey mapping individual assignment and using a single open source application for both individual and group assignments.

Here is the list of apps I am using to reach my pedagogical and student/facilitator experience goals this term (with lots of open source goodness):

Grav CMS
GitLab (hosted at sfu.ca)
GitHub Atom
Swipe
RocketChat
Sandstorm
Canvas LMS (well, no surprises there)

You can check out the in-progress Canvas site for the course at https://canvas.sfu.ca/courses/38847.

CMPT-363 Summer 2018 Canvas Site, with Embedded Grav Open Course Hub Pages Figure 1. CMPT-363 Summer 2018 Canvas Site, with Embedded Grav Open Course Hub Pages

I’ve been once again feverishly working in the open on the Fall 2017 Course Hub (built with my Grav Open Course Hub and using a flipped-LMS approach, naturally!) for SFU CMPT 363 so that potential students can better self-assess course fit before our first class meets in-person on Sept 6th.

The year brings some changes, with the addition of an individual component (reflective learning log) to the two group assignments and an expansion of the individual usability assessment assignment. Students will research and design potential user experience improvements for an open source project of their choice.

Here is the list of apps I am using to reach my pedagogical and student/facilitator experience goals this term (with lots of open source goodness):

Grav CMS
GitLab (hosted at sfu.ca)
GitHub Desktop
Swipe
RocketChat
Sandstorm
Canvas LMS

You can check out the nearly complete Open Course Hub at paulhibbitts.net/cmpt-363-173/.

CMPT-363 Fall 2017 Course Hub Figure 1. CMPT-363 Fall 2017 Course Hub

I’ve been feverishly working in the open on the Fall 2016 Course Hub (built with my Grav Course Hub and using a flipped-LMS approach, naturally!) for SFU CMPT 363 so that potential students can better self-assess course fit before online registration starts on July 4th.

A significant change to the course this year is that students will research and design potential user experience improvements for an open source project of their choice. Also, the entire course outline is a structured as a series of questions, which will be examined, discussed and experienced as the course proceeds.

You can check out the under construction Course Hub at paulhibbitts.net/cmpt-363-163/.

I’ve been thinking about all the different activities involved so far in the creation of the Grav Course Hub, and I thought I would share them here:



I’ve been further refining my sustainable approach of an open design practice for my experience design work in the education field, and (bravely or foolishly) I’ve attempted to craft a working definition of the phrase:




Interested in learning more about open business models? Be sure to check out Made With Creative Commons on Medium.

What is a flipped LMS?
A flipped LMS approach is where an open platform, in the control of course participants, serves as an alternative front-end to the institutional LMS

Flipped-LMS approach
Figure 1. Flipped-LMS approach.

Why flip the LMS?
To support pedagogical goals unmet by current LMS/platform
To deliver a better student (and facilitator) experience
To increase capability of access, sharing and collaboration

What to “Flip” Your LMS With?
Ideally an open and collaborative platform, as shown below:

Open + collaborative Web platform
Figure 2. Open + collaborative Web platform.

Flipped-LMS approach using an open + collaborative Web platform
Figure 3. Flipped-LMS approach using an open + collaborative Web platform.

For example, the modern flat-file CMS Grav along with GitHub and an automatic deployment service such as Deploy can be used quite effectively by tech-savvy educators as an open and collaborative platform to support a flipped-LMS approach:

Flipped-LMS approach using Grav, GitHub, and Deploy

Figure 4. Flipped-LMS approach using Grav CMS, GitHub, and Deploy.

When flipping your LMS what are some key experience design goals?
Student experience design goals:
Engaging
Organized
Relevant
Convenient
Enjoyable

Facilitator experience design goals:
Controllable (i.e. manageable)
Pliable (i.e. flexible)
Efficient
Enjoyable (hey, instructors are people too…)

Want to get started with flipping your own LMS? Since this article was written I’ve built an open source project using the Grav CMS to help other tech-savvy instructors - explore the on-line demo and then head over to Grav Course Hub Getting Started Guide to get going.

While trying to visualize my flipped-LMS approach using an open and collaborative platform, it’s become apparent that I am looking at two distinct, though related, models.

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For my situation, I use the flat-file CMS Grav to provide an open and collaborative platform when using a flipped-LMS approach.

As a modern flat-file CMS, Grav can take full advantage of today’s ecosystem of open and collaborative editing services, such as GitHub or GitLab. In this article we will look at how to easily use Grav with GitHub Desktop (which uses GitHub and Git for source control) and the automatic deployment service Deploy to result in a very efficient, open and collaborative workflow. No scripting or command line interactions will be required, I promise.

This guide is now outdated. View the updated GitHub & GitHub Desktop tutorial on the new learn.hibbittsdesign.org site.

As an educator, the use of a service such as GitHub to store an online course companion is very appealing as not only does it support an open practice but also enables students to control the very learning environment that they are using. I first described this workflow in my earlier article My Dream Workflow as an Instructor.

Before you start this tutorial I suggest you first get your Grav site up and running locally using MAMP, as outlined in Running Grav Locally with MAMP. By utilizing MAMP you will then have a complete, local version of your course companion site running on your computer that can be easily updated and then deployed to your Webserver.

This tutorial should take about 15 minutes, and once completed you will have an efficient, open, and collaborative workflow for yourself and your students!

Step-by-step instructions

  1. If you do not done so already, sign up for a GitHub account.

  2. Download the GitHub Desktop client for your computer (Mac or PC), and once it is installed launch the application and proceed with the setup process to enter your GitHub account credentials.

    GitHub Desktop setup welcome
    Figure 1. GitHub Desktop setup welcome.

    GitHub Desktop connect to GitHub
    Figure 2. GitHub Desktop connect to GitHub.

  3. Assuming you already have a Grav site present on your computer (and preferably one that is already viewable via MAMP), you next need to create a GitHub Repository of your site. It is recommended that if this is the first time you are using GitHub with Grav that you add the entire Grav site to GitHub, but other approaches are possible such as only storing the “user” folder (see the provided additional resources at the end of this article for more options).

    GitHub Desktop main window
    Figure 3. GitHub Desktop main window, displaying the included tutorial.

    Press the “Add a Repository” button (upper-right plus(+) sign in the main window) in the GitHub Desktop client, select the “Add” tab within the displayed dialog box, and then press the “Choose…” button to select the folder containing your entire Grav site.

    GitHub Desktop add Repository dialog
    Figure 4. GitHub Desktop add Repository dialog.

    GitHub Desktop local Repository added
    Figure 5. GitHub Desktop local Repository added.

  4. You are now ready for the first commit to your new GitHub repository. Whenever you make a commit you will need to include a brief text summary - as this is your first commit enter the text “First commit.” into the “Summary” text box (above the “Description” text field), and then press the button “Commit to master”.

    GitHub Desktop first commit
    Figure 6. GitHub Desktop first commit.

  5. Since this is your first commit to your repository, the “Publish” button (upper-left of main window) will need to be also pressed to actually perform the actual file updates. Once the “Publish” button is pressed enter a short description for your new GitHub repository and then select which GitHub account you want to publish to (if you have multiple accounts).

    GitHub Desktop repository details dialog box
    Figure 7. GitHub Desktop - repository details dialog box.

    GitHub Desktop publishing the repository
    Figure 8. GitHub Desktop publishing the repository.

    GitHub Desktop - repository published
    Figure 9. GitHub Desktop repository published.

  6. Once this process is complete you should now be able to view your Grav site files stored on GitHub - please do this now to ensure that everything went as expected. If you have any issues during this process you may find more detailed GitHub Desktop client support information at https://help.github.com/desktop/.

    GitHub repository of your Grav site
    Figure 10. GitHub repository of your Grav site.

  7. The final step in this process is to trigger an automatic deployment of any changed GitHub files to your Webserver. I recommend you use a Web service that provides this functionality - such as Deploy or Buddy. You can learn how to set up Deploy for use with GitHub in the Deploy support article How do I Start an Automatic Deployment from GitHub? and how to set up Buddy for use with GitHub in the Buddy support articles How to integrate Buddy with GitHub? and How to upload files to FTP/SFTP? .

Congratulations! With the above steps completed you now have a Grav site which you can run and test locally (using MAMP), and with only one click in the GitHub Desktop application have any changed local site files updated in your GitHub repository and then have them automatically pushed to your Webserver hosting your Grav site (via either Deploy or Buddy). In my experience, I can make an update to my Grav site and sync changes to GitHub for automatic deployment to my Webserver in as little as 30 seconds.

 GitHub Desktop repository changes screen
Figure 19. GitHub Desktop main window. When any changes are detected they will be displayed on this screen and can be pushed to GitHub when the “Commit and Sync master” button is pressed.

Students can also now make suggested changes to your Grav site via GitHub or GitHub repository file links provided in your Grav site (see the bottom of this example page at http://paulhibbitts.net/cmpt-363-153//resources). GitHub will provide an excellent view of proposed changes, which you can immediately accept or start a further discussion about these possible changes with the student submitting them.

You can press the GitHub Desktop client “Sync” button (which replaces the “Publish” button you previously used) in the GitHub Desktop client to also download any changes made to the online GitHub repository down to your own computer.

Interested in learning even more about using Grav with GitHub? Check out these two super-informative posts on the Grav Blog: